Gun Control: A Life or Death Issue

Back to Article
Back to Article

Gun Control: A Life or Death Issue

Keitlin Ushe and Bella Fieldman

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






After the tragic school shooting in Parkland, Florida, people across the United States found not only a way to mourn, but to protest for an end to the repeated shootings we have seen in the last few decades. On March 14th, many people, including Columbia Secondary School students, marched alongside a nation who has had enough. This movement was rightfully named #Enough, the hashtag creating a popular way to discuss it on Twitter. Through social media, different views come to light. Gun control is one of the most controversial topics of our days, with strong individuals backing each side. On one hand, Americans’ inalienable right to bear arms is stated in the Constitution. However, this right was declared in a time when automatic firearms did not exist, and they have now proven to be extremely deadly for mass populations. With the shooting capability of modern weapons, it is much easier to open fire on a big crowd and cause unimaginable damage. The Second Amendment’s relevance to society is weak, and may no longer apply to the current situation. The purpose of the demonstration was to demand political reform on this particular amendment.  

The student government organized this event, and they brought it to life by working out the details with faculty to ensure the day would go smoothly and safely. Teachers were instructed to start the day off with a brief discussion of social awareness and acceptance of others. The idea behind this stems from the prominent belief that most school shooters have been bullied, neglected, or diagnosed with mental health issues. Therefore, they reasoned that students and staff could help prevent shootings by learning how to change their behavior towards these people. Conversations about this topic need to happen; disregard of it only creates a harsher environment. If open discourse only resolves a fraction of the gun control issue, it is still a step in the right direction.

At 10 a.m., students from middle school and high school alike were released from class and filed into the yard. Creating a huge circle, the yard was silent for 17 minutes, one for each of the lives lost in Parkland. With solemn faces and posters held high, it was an extremely emotional moment in CSS history. Many were seen with quiet tears running down their faces, overcome by the powerful respect from hundreds of students for kids they had never met. Following the minutes of silence, chants started to unfold and quickly began to gain power. Eventually, every student was shouting along with the group; “No More Silence, End Gun Violence”, “Hey, Hey, Ho, Ho, We Need Federal Gun Control”, and “My School Needs Funds, Not Guns” were some of the most popular chants that erupted from the group. With the middle schoolers returning to class, high schoolers and surrounding supporters marched to the Borough President Gale Brewer’s office, which is nearby the school on 125th Street. Ethan Rubin, junior, reached out to the Borough President’s office and Ms. Brewer herself was gracious enough to respond and offered to come to her uptown office to greet the students. Following this encounter, students marched to the State Office Building on 125th Street at Adam Clayton Powell, Jr. Blvd, where the office of Congressman (who?) is located.

One of the most inspirational parts of the march was the fact that, for the most part, it was organized by young students. They saw the changes they wanted to see in America, and they fought for it. It goes to show that just because you are young does not mean you do not have power. Many other walkouts took place at high schools across the nation that day, with a climaxing effort in Washington D.C. on March 24th. Many people from Columbia Secondary took a bus down to the Capital city and marched at the United States Capitol, the very building in which legislative decisions are made. The coming months will reveal whether or not the government will take serious action, but the protest has already raised awareness and discussion around these issues.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Leave a Comment

If you want a picture to show with your comment, go get a gravatar.




*

Navigate Left
  • Gun Control: A Life or Death Issue

    Feature

    March of Our Lives at Central Park

  • Gun Control: A Life or Death Issue

    Arts and Entertainment

    Review On Black Panther Album

  • Gun Control: A Life or Death Issue

    Editorial

    Annual Junior College Trip

  • Gun Control: A Life or Death Issue

    Feature

    AP Hill Gets a Window

  • Gun Control: A Life or Death Issue

    News

    Gun Safety Assembly

  • Gun Control: A Life or Death Issue

    News

    Poem In Your Pocket Day

  • Gun Control: A Life or Death Issue

    News

    New Lateness Policy: Is It Effective?

  • Gun Control: A Life or Death Issue

    Feature

    Pyeongchang Olympics, North + South Korean Relations

  • Gun Control: A Life or Death Issue

    Feature

    For the Love of Food

  • Gun Control: A Life or Death Issue

    Editorial

    2018: Diversity at the Oscars and the (Little) Difference It Made

Navigate Right
Gun Control: A Life or Death Issue