March of Our Lives at Central Park

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By Rhododendrites [CC BY-SA 4.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0)], from Wikimedia Commons

By Rhododendrites [CC BY-SA 4.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0)], from Wikimedia Commons

By Rhododendrites [CC BY-SA 4.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0)], from Wikimedia Commons

Yobany Reyes, Editor

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A product of the shockwave created by the Parkland massacre, as well as the nationwide gun violence epidemic, the March of Our Lives movement became widespread throughout the United States.

Hundreds of thousands gathered all across Manhattan on Saturday, March 24. Armed with neon orange clothing and various banners and posters, the protesters began at 72nd Street and Central Park West, marching all the way down to 43rd Street. According to Mayor Bill de Blasio’s twitter account, the final estimate of protesters that amassed was 175,000.

Brandishing banners and flags, protesters made their way across the city chanting “I refuse to be a target,” “No more silence, End gun violence,” and more. Rallies made their way past Trump Towers, where protesters chanted “Shame,” due to President Donald Trump’s associations with the National Rifle Association (NRA), not to mention his current predicaments with North Korea.

“This madman is trying to take us into nuclear war, as if we don’t have enough already,” said Alice Sutter of the Raging Grannies Association, who oppose all forms of militarization and warfare. “He’s spending all of our tax dollars on war, and we’re really in dismal shape right now.”

The rally also features many testimonies and speeches by victims of gun violence, such as Sam Hendler, 16, a victim of the Parkland High School shooting, and Meghan Bonner, 17, also another victim. Hendler called for a moment of silence in commemoration for the victims of the Parkland High School shooting, and Bonner called for change.

“The adults failed us, and now 17 people are dead,” stated Bonner.

 

The majority of protesters were marching for the protection of students and for the preservation of the future.

“Students are change,” said Sonja Noring of the League of Women Voters. “Students are making change. Every time they speak to another person about an issue of importance, every time they learn more about U.S history and civics, and understand how the government works, that’s how you make change. Slowly, gradually, over time, one person at a time, and it works. It really works. Everything important that has been done in this country, every important movement in the past 50 years, or more, has been student-lead. Voting rights, civil rights, gay rights, everything has been student lead. Students will do it, and are doing it.”

 

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